Trail Tested: Bosski 1600 AL ATV Wagon

Accessories, Home Page Slide Show, Implements/Attachments — on October 11, 2010 at 12:14 pm
Getting way out there in the boonies is the best way to explore the natural world, but there’s only so far you can go with the gear you can stuff in a backpack or strap to the racks of your ATV. I’ve seen plenty of creative storage solutions, but when you really want to haul serious quantities of gear for a multi-day trip off of your machine, you’ll need a big, bad trailer.
I’ve known about Bosski’s ATV Wagons for quite some time, and have always wanted to organize a trip that was an appropriate test of these extremely tough-looking haulers. From what I had read, they’re designed for the kind of trips that involve jagged, challenging terrain and require a lot of gear for survival. It sounded like the perfect opportunity to scare up some adventure.
We recently embarked on such a journey, with three days of camping along the woodsy trails of northern Wisconsin. While a trip through the so-called Northwoods may not sound as adventurous and difficult as crossing the Mojave Desert or surmounting a steep pass in the Rocky Mountains, the amount of abuse our trailer took on this journey was surprising.
Our choice was the biggest model available — the 1600 AL with a lightweight aluminum body, all-wheel independent suspension, its own power brakes, weather-sealed lid with gas shocks, locking latches, a cargo rack on top, external fuel can holder, four 25-inch balloon tires and 45 cubic feet of storage. Naked and empty, it weighs a considerable 337 pounds.
After installing the brake controller on our tow rig, a Yamaha Grizzly 700, and loading up enough gear to keep four guys alive, sheltered, comfortable and well fed for three days, we were ready to go. Our pack list included a boom box, lanterns, three tents, chairs, sleeping gear, two coolers, food and drinks, rain gear, spare tools, an air compressor, clothing, bedding, multiple tire-repair kits and a lot more — it was absolutely packed to the lip.
With many hundreds of pounds inside (it’s rated to haul 1,600), the 1600 AL went down the trail like a dream, and a bit like a freight train, as the driver could sense the heavy load. We were able to crest 50 mph on straight trails and maintain a good 20 mph on rocky, tight trails through the woods with the Grizzly.
Its power brakes worked well, but immediate, downhill panic-stops can get hairy and are best avoided, as that much weight isn’t easily stopped. Its suspension did a good job keeping our goods (some fragile) safe and secure. Nothing broke, got dusty or wet, which is saying a lot.
An unexpected change in weather seriously affected our second day, as a major windstorm brought down trees and turned our full-day trail into a war zone. Hardwoods were literally everywhere. Our Bosski had no choice but to bound over countless fully-grown logs, with 11 inches of clearance and occasional help from spotters to make sure we didn’t damage anything — but mostly we just let the trailer scrape and claw its way through, as we had to keep moving and had a lot of ground to cover.
Far from the burden we thought it may be on our three-day ride, it was our saving grace time and again, hardly slowed us down and allowed us citified campers to bring everything but the kitchen sink. This is one incredible trailer. From our experience, I would feel comfortable taking this on the most difficult trip anybody could think of. And, it’s worth mentioning, we didn’t burn any drive belts on the Grizzly along the way. This well built trailer gets an A+. — Kaiser
Price: $1,899
Contact: www.ATVwagon.com
Check back for the full tale of our adventure in a future issue.
For a video feature on the trip, including the trailer, visit www.zrwhat.com, click Videos and Wisconsin ATV Camping Trip.
Getting way out there in the boonies is the best way to explore the natural world, but there’s only so far you can go with the gear you can stuff in a

Bosski's 1600 Al ATV Wagon

Bosski's 1600 Al ATV Wagon

backpack or strap to the racks of your ATV. I’ve seen plenty of creative storage solutions, but when you really want to haul serious quantities of gear for a multi-day trip off of your machine, you’ll need a big, bad trailer.

I’ve known about Bosski’s ATV Wagons for quite some time, and have always wanted to organize a trip that was an appropriate test of these extremely tough-looking haulers. From what I had read, they’re designed for the kind of trips that involve jagged, challenging terrain and require a lot of gear for survival. It sounded like the perfect opportunity to scare up some adventure.
We recently embarked on such a journey, with three days of camping along the woodsy trails of northern Wisconsin. While a trip through the so-called Northwoods may not sound as adventurous and difficult as crossing the Mojave Desert or surmounting a steep pass in the Rocky Mountains, the amount of abuse our trailer took on this journey was surprising.
Bosski 1600 AL ATV Wagon

Bosski 1600 AL ATV Wagon

Our choice was the biggest model available — the 1600 AL with a lightweight aluminum body, all-wheel independent suspension, its own power brakes, weather-sealed lid with gas shocks, locking latches, a cargo rack on top, external fuel can holder, four 25-inch balloon tires and 45 cubic feet of storage. Naked and empty, it weighs a considerable 337 pounds.

After installing the brake controller on our tow rig, a Yamaha Grizzly 700, and loading up enough gear to keep four guys alive, sheltered, comfortable and well fed for three days, we were ready to go. Our pack list included a boom box, lanterns, three tents, chairs, sleeping gear, two coolers, food and drinks, rain gear, spare tools, an air compressor, clothing, bedding, multiple tire-repair kits and a lot more — it was absolutely packed to the lip.
With many hundreds of pounds inside (it’s rated to haul 1,600), the 1600 AL went down the trail like a dream, and a bit like a freight train, as the driver could sense the heavy load. We were able to crest 50 mph on straight trails and maintain a good 20 mph on rocky, tight trails through the woods with the Grizzly. Its power brakes worked well, but immediate, downhill panic-stops can get hairy and are best avoided, as that much weight isn’t easily stopped. Its suspension did a good job keeping our goods (some fragile) safe and secure. Nothing broke, got dusty or wet, which is saying a lot.
An unexpected change in weather seriously affected our second day, as a major windstorm brought down trees and turned our full-day trail into a war

Bosski's 1600 Al ATV Wagon is a beast that can go anywhere your ATV can!

Bosski's 1600 Al ATV Wagon is a beast that can go anywhere your ATV can!

zone. Hardwoods were literally everywhere. Our Bosski had no choice but to bound over countless fully-grown logs, with 11 inches of clearance and occasional help from spotters to make sure we didn’t damage anything — but mostly we just let the trailer scrape and claw its way through, as we had to keep moving and had a lot of ground to cover.

Far from the burden we thought it may be on our three-day ride, it was our saving grace time and again, hardly slowed us down and allowed us citified campers to bring everything but the kitchen sink. This is one incredible trailer. From our experience, I would feel comfortable taking this on the most difficult trip anybody could think of. And, it’s worth mentioning, we didn’t burn any drive belts on the Grizzly along the way. This well built trailer gets an A+. — Kaiser
Price: $1,899
Contact: www.ATVwagon.com

Check back for the full tale of our adventure in an upcoming issue of ATV Reviews.

CLICK HERE for a video feature on the Wisconsin trip, including the Bosski trailer.

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